Abstract

Recently, the open area in the Arctic has been increasing due to the global warming, and the Northern Sea Route (NSR) and exploitation of natural resources there, such as oil and gas, are paid attention to. Although new opportunities have large benefits, there are some concerns because of the expansion of the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) where seawater is mixed with numerous pack ice floes. Owing to this environmental change in the Arctic, accurately solving fluid-ice-ship interaction problems becomes more important than ever for ensuring the safety of ships in this sea.

In this paper, a two-dimensional wedge slamming in the vicinity of floating ice is studied as one of the fluid-ice-ship interaction problems. Firstly, a tuning-free fluid and structure interaction solver is developed by using the Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS), and its accuracy is verified by benchmark tests of a rigid wedge slamming and a hydroelastic wedge slamming. Numerical results are subjected to quantitative evaluation. After the validation, a rigid wedge slamming in the vicinity of floating ice is simulated, and it is obtained that the slamming forces increase due to the existence of the ice. The influence of floating ice against the slamming force on the wedge is discussed. These results provide the potential applicability of the MPS for complicated fluid-ice-ship interaction problems.

Introduction

Recently, the interest in the use of the Northern Sea Route (NSR) and the exploitation of natural resources there, such as oil and gas, has been increasing due to the decrease of the sea ice in the Arctic. On the other hand, the sea area has changed from the area covered with ice sheets into the area where seawater is mixed with numerous pack ice floes. As the open water area has expanded, high waves are frequently reported (Thomson, 2014) and it is expected that this tendency will increase more and more. This variation in the Arctic makes fluid-ice-ship interaction problems. Among those, a water impact is an important problem that causes high impulsive loads on local components.

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